Vince Carter Is Apparently The Sole Reason Canada Has Bottle Service

  Nathaniel S. Butler/Getty Images

Nathaniel S. Butler/Getty Images

Sean Menard’s The Carter Effect (now on Netflix) is loaded with striking anecdotes about the lasting legacy of former Raptor Vince Carter in the city of Toronto. Carter’s high-flying, ferocious dunks inspired young artists, musicians, fashion designers, and a generation of Canadian basketball players (Andrew Wiggins, Anthony Bennett, Kelly Olynyk, and, regrettably, Tristan Thompson, among others). In just an hour, a straight line is drawn from Vince’s rookie year to the emergence of Drake as the dominant force in music. But the most notable takeaway might be that Vince is essentially responsible for introducing bottle service to Canadian nightlife.

Early in his career, Carter invested in a club called Inside (a bad name for a just about anything but that's neither here nor there). Co-owner Travis Agresti claims Vince took the business so seriously that he showed up to meetings with a clipboard, something I stopped doing in fifth grade. Little did Agresti know he was in the presence of a young Jon Taffer:

"He couldn't understand why we have 1,500 people in here and we're selling single drinks on the floor but there's tables everywhere ... 'I don't understand why we can't do what they do in the U.S. and sell bottles to people.'"

Without Vince, the Raptors franchise may have moved, Drake would lack the confidence to pursue music, the dunk contest would be extinct, and Toronto’s nightclubs might still be making rich people wait in line for drinks. The current Raptors are no doubt thankful this entertainment option will be available to them after their inevitable Eastern Conference Semifinals loss to the Cavaliers up the street on Wednesday night. |ES|

  Andrew D. Bernstein/Getty Images

Andrew D. Bernstein/Getty Images